Why is science so neglected in modern politics?

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Why is science so neglected in modern politics? There are many reasons, and they are all rather disconcerting. In this post and in many posts for the future, I will be taking a look at science in politics, it’s role, and how we should really be focussing more on it as a country.

Is science actually being neglected?

To put it simply, yes. One of the most pressing science issues today is climate change. I will deal with it in a post sometime this week or next week, but it is truly being left out of current politics.

“In 2008, Otto says, candidates were asked nearly 3,000 questions during the campaign. Only six of those questions were about climate change.

Flash forward eight years to Democratic and Republican debates that were each held within a week of 195 countries signing the Paris climate accords: not a single journalist in either debate asked the candidates about climate change.

Too many of the people involved in political campaigns wrongly assume that the public is not interested in questions about science, Otto says.” (Adam Wernick, PRI)

We also saw a lack of questions regarding STEM in the entire primary process for both republicans and democrats. If we want to make any progress as a country, or even as a human race, science issues must be discussed and analyzed critically.

Why is it happening?

There are many reasons why it could be happening, namely that some people simply do not care. They just want to continue their lives without worries. Another reason would be that almost everyone involved in politics has experience in law, journalism, or other humanitarian endeavors. These, as you may have realized, do not put much focus or emphasis into science. In fact, the last science experience that many modern politicians and journalists had was in high school.

What should be addressed?

If you want to check out pressing and relevant questions, check out this article:

(http://sciencedebate.org/20questions)

This is a comprehensive list of questions that should be discussed and addressed in the general election, future primaries, and current politics in general.

These are questions like (paraphrased):

What is your stance on human-induced climate change? What do you suggest we do to tackle the problem?

How will you encourage and foster innovation with your time serving in today’s political system? What is your plan for aiding scientific progress in order to help humanity?

How will you deal with funding scientific and medical research?

What’s your plan on attempting to develop alternate energy sources? Will it be cost-effective?

If you want to check out more pressing questions and relevant predicaments that need to be addressed, check out this website for more:

(http://sciencedebate.org/20questions)

We live in a society dominated by science, reason, innovation, and technology, and if we do not address these issues in modern politics, then how will we ever make any progress? We need to have informed dialogue from both sides, and we have to have claims and plans backed by evidence, logic, and reason.

Author: Joe Schmid

Questions? Ask away at josephschmid4@gmail.com

Works Cited

Wernick, Adam. “Why Aren’t the Presidential Candidates Being Asked about Science?” Public Radio International. Public Radio International, 28 Aug. 2016. Web. 28 Aug. 2016. <http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-08-28/why-arent-presidential-candidates-being-asked-about-science&gt;.

“The Questions.” ScienceDebate.org. ScienceDebate.org, n.d. Web. 28 Aug. 2016. <http://sciencedebate.org/20questions&gt;.

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